504

Section 504 of the U.S. Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is designed to help parents of students with physical or mental impairments in public schools, or publicly funded private schools, work with educators to design customized educational plans. These 504 plans legally ensure that students will be treated fairly at school. PTAA provides necessary accommodations to students with disabilities that are not severe enough to qualify them for special education, but which nevertheless are substantially limiting their learning or other major life activities.  If need is established or develops, the 504 Commnittee shall develop an appropriate Accommodation Plan for a student whose disability is hindering access to a free and public education, extra-curricular activities

Students can qualify for 504 plans if they have physical or mental impairments that affect or limit any of their abilities to:

  • walk, breathe, eat, or sleep
  • communicate, see, hear, or speak
  • read, concentrate, think, or learn
  • stand, bend, lift, or work

 Examples of accommodations in 504 plans include:

  • preferential seating
  • extended time on tests and assignments
  • reduced homework or classwork
  • verbal, visual, or technology aids
  • modified textbooks or audio-video materials
  • behavior management support
  • adjusted class schedules or grading
  • verbal testing
  • excused lateness, absence, or missed classwork
  • pre-approved nurse's office visits and accompaniment to visits
  • occupational or physical therapy

The goal of 504 plans is for students to be educated in regular classrooms along with the services, accommodations, or educational aids they might need. If students with these plans can't achieve satisfactory academic success, as is determined by the school, then alternative settings in the school or private or residential programs can be considered.

504 Plans vs. IEPs

A 504 plan is different from an individualized education program (IEP). The main difference is that a 504 plan modifies a student's regular education program in a regular classroom setting. A 504 plan is monitored by classroom teachers. A student with an IEP, as part of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004), may receive different educational services in a special or regular educational setting, depending on the student's need. IEP programs are delivered and monitored by additional school support staff.

Also, parental approval and involvement is required for an IEP, but not for a 504 plan. Full parental participation in the 504 plan process, however, is important for the student's academic success.